1. girljanitor:

lolitapop09:

sipala:

ruthhopkins:

Boarding schools used Native appropriation to embarrass, degrade & exercise control over Native children. Native appropriation is an extension of the federal government’s assimilation and termination policies to ‘kill the Indian and save the man.’

gross

Those nuns’ smug faces contrasted against the children’s. It breaks me.

In case anyone was wondering why this post isn’t so much funny as it is just horrifyingly true
Or kind of like how I spent probably like 2000 bucks so white men could teach me the history of my own fucking people
Or how I had to explain to my own fucking white sister why it wasn’t okay for her to make money dressed up like an “Indian Princess”
Or how my white ex-in-laws fucking accused me of being a pothead for smudging my fucking room and used that for grounds to kick me out (with no other place to go), which was traumatic enough that I never fucking did it again
Or how last week at work I had someone literally tell me they thought addiction to tobacco was Native American’s “revenge” for genocide, because we’re extinct now or almost because “you don’t see a lot of them these days”, and killing “us” with cigarettes is “their” revenge
This photo is a picture of what it feels like to be a ghost
A fucking ghost in your own native land.

    girljanitor:

    lolitapop09:

    sipala:

    ruthhopkins:

    Boarding schools used Native appropriation to embarrass, degrade & exercise control over Native children. Native appropriation is an extension of the federal government’s assimilation and termination policies to ‘kill the Indian and save the man.’

    gross

    Those nuns’ smug faces contrasted against the children’s. It breaks me.

    In case anyone was wondering why this post isn’t so much funny as it is just horrifyingly true

    Or kind of like how I spent probably like 2000 bucks so white men could teach me the history of my own fucking people

    Or how I had to explain to my own fucking white sister why it wasn’t okay for her to make money dressed up like an “Indian Princess”

    Or how my white ex-in-laws fucking accused me of being a pothead for smudging my fucking room and used that for grounds to kick me out (with no other place to go), which was traumatic enough that I never fucking did it again

    Or how last week at work I had someone literally tell me they thought addiction to tobacco was Native American’s “revenge” for genocide, because we’re extinct now or almost because “you don’t see a lot of them these days”, and killing “us” with cigarettes is “their” revenge

    This photo is a picture of what it feels like to be a ghost

    A fucking ghost in your own native land.

    Reblogged from: witchseed
  2. From the Archives: Remembering Yuri Kochiyama

    Asia Pacific Forum - June 16, 2014 Show

    "We’ve got to stop her somehow. We cannot let this go on. There are too many people dying, whether in wars or from starvation, diseases, just all the kinds of negativities that those in power can do. And so I hope anyone will come into the movement. We have to stop American power.

    But I want to just end it with: I want to thank all the people who have come into my life, whether it was through the movement or just as neighbors or what. You have all added so much to my life. Without you, I wouldn’t know anything because I started off as such a small-towner who didn’t know what was going on. So thank you all of you who might be listening who might have known me at some time. I thank you for your friendship and your comradeship. Thanks.”

  3. In a hospital. At the beach. Hamas, Israel tells us, is hiding among civilians

    honeyrococo:

    "They hid at the El-Wafa hospital.

    They hid at the Al-Aqsa hospital.

    They hid at the beach, where children played football.

    They hid at the yard of 75-year-old Muhammad Hamad.

    They hid among the residential quarters of Shujaya.

    They hid in the neighbourhoods of…

    Reblogged from: honeyrococo
  4. NEW ZEALAND - Māori and Pacific women issued a challenge to the women’s movement at the United Women’s Convention in 1979. Donna Awatere (left) and Mona Papali’i (right) accused the movement of racism, arguing that Pākehā feminists ignored the issues most important to Māori women. When the first National Black Women’s Hui was held the following year, over 70 women attended. The black women’s movement discussed racism, health, imprisonment rates, black–white relationships, assertiveness, class and sexism. Jan Smith from the group Black Dykes commented that ‘being a black woman requires you to have a split personality. The Women’s Liberation Movement is racist, the anti-racist movement is sexist and the socialist movement is both sexist and racist. This leaves black women out on a limb.’
Among Pākehā feminists, the response to this challenge to racism was volcanic, with pages of Broadsheet (New Zealand’s women’s liberation magazine) filled with letters in support or opposition. The charge of racism was taken seriously; some groups and organisations put in place Treaty of Waitangi training and restructured to share decision-making power and funding with Māori. Within Broadsheet reporting of Māori activism increased, and the collective published Donna Awatere’s Maori sovereignty in 1984.
Source: Megan Cook. ‘Women’s movement - The women’s liberation movement’, Te Ara - the Encyclopedia of New Zealand, updated 15-Nov-12 URL: http://www.TeAra.govt.nz/en/photograph/27912/challenging-racism
thisiseverydayracism

    NEW ZEALAND - Māori and Pacific women issued a challenge to the women’s movement at the United Women’s Convention in 1979. Donna Awatere (left) and Mona Papali’i (right) accused the movement of racism, arguing that Pākehā feminists ignored the issues most important to Māori women. When the first National Black Women’s Hui was held the following year, over 70 women attended. The black women’s movement discussed racism, health, imprisonment rates, black–white relationships, assertiveness, class and sexism. Jan Smith from the group Black Dykes commented that ‘being a black woman requires you to have a split personality. The Women’s Liberation Movement is racist, the anti-racist movement is sexist and the socialist movement is both sexist and racist. This leaves black women out on a limb.’

    Among Pākehā feminists, the response to this challenge to racism was volcanic, with pages of Broadsheet (New Zealand’s women’s liberation magazine) filled with letters in support or opposition. The charge of racism was taken seriously; some groups and organisations put in place Treaty of Waitangi training and restructured to share decision-making power and funding with Māori. Within Broadsheet reporting of Māori activism increased, and the collective published Donna Awatere’s Maori sovereignty in 1984.

    Source: Megan Cook. ‘Women’s movement - The women’s liberation movement’, Te Ara - the Encyclopedia of New Zealand, updated 15-Nov-12 URL: http://www.TeAra.govt.nz/en/photograph/27912/challenging-racism

    thisiseverydayracism

    Reblogged from: witchseed
  5. More portraits of black actors, authors, and musicians from the Yale archival collection "Living Portraits: Carl Van Vechten’s Color Photographs of African Americans, 1939-1964"taf-art

     

    Reblogged from: lawd-knows
  6. These writers are so stunningly different from one another, in a way that makes me feel so happy about poetry and people and the creative project that is life. One thing I feel they have in common, though, is a badass feminist bent ranging from subtle to screamed. 

Alidio: “Women sitting / on cardboard boxes, pink sheets / hover over Tupperware of food / over the aqueduct, under the overpass / they unpack their shoulders, their shoulders / fan out in long arcs thrown back” 

Bell: “She smells her hands / Garlic, always // Truly, I have been kissed // She wanders to an evergreen and squats over its fallen needles / Pushes fingertips in, pulls out // Does the Sibyl keep her own time?” 

Higdon: “Down & rolling faster & a funny color, headed / untidy / to bed with this day on my shoulders. / I never look as pretty / in the morning as I do in the evening / when I’m finally used to looking at myself.” 

So check these out: they’re delightfully affordable: Solitude Being Alien is just $7, and The State In Which is the best $4 you’ve ever spent. (To get your copy of Book of Sibyl, contact Amy.) (via Three for Three — Sarah Heady)

FYEAH SARAH HEADY

    These writers are so stunningly different from one another, in a way that makes me feel so happy about poetry and people and the creative project that is life. One thing I feel they have in common, though, is a badass feminist bent ranging from subtle to screamed.

    Alidio: “Women sitting / on cardboard boxes, pink sheets / hover over Tupperware of food / over the aqueduct, under the overpass / they unpack their shoulders, their shoulders / fan out in long arcs thrown back”

    Bell: “She smells her hands / Garlic, always // Truly, I have been kissed // She wanders to an evergreen and squats over its fallen needles / Pushes fingertips in, pulls out // Does the Sibyl keep her own time?”

    Higdon: “Down & rolling faster & a funny color, headed / untidy / to bed with this day on my shoulders. / I never look as pretty / in the morning as I do in the evening / when I’m finally used to looking at myself.”

    So check these out: they’re delightfully affordable: Solitude Being Alien is just $7, and The State In Which is the best $4 you’ve ever spent. (To get your copy of Book of Sibyl, contact Amy.) (via Three for Three — Sarah Heady)

    FYEAH SARAH HEADY

  7. UPPING THE AUNTY - MEERA SETHI

    I’ve always loved Meera Sethi’s colourful and unique work but her ‘Upping the Aunty’ project really changed the game. 

    'Upping the Aunty' celebrates the South Asian “aunty”; her personal style and unique role in our lives. Meera flips the script on street style, by focusing her lens on aunties with swag. 

    Here are some of the awesome Auntys you can find on the Tumblr page

    1. Unknown Swag Aunty - Photo: Vivek Shraya

    2. Rita Aunty - Photo: Meera Sethi

    3. Gunalaxsmi Aunty - Photo: Meera Sethi

    4. Sita Aunty - Photo: Meera Sethi

    Meera is on the lookout for contributors to the project, so If you have an aunty whose style you love, send a new or vintage photo (with your aunty’s permission) over to art@meerasethi.com!

    - S two-browngirls

    Reblogged from: lawd-knows
  8. Reblogged from: queercrisis
  9. During my two months of dissertation research at the LHA, I spent an afternoon hanging out with Colette Montoya, a volunteer who works on digitizing the tapes every Friday. Colette is 31, a queer woman-of-color finishing her library science degree. She’s been volunteering at the archives for a couple of years, and she makes the regular 1.5-hour subway trip to the archives from her home in Queens, even though she’s already met the internship requirements for her degree. I asked Colette questions as she showed me how the tapes are digitized, and I guess I seemed surprised by the scale of this task relative to what she can get done in a day, week, or year. Nonplussed, Colette explained, “All these boxes are tapes,” pointing at the wall, “and they’re in sort of an order. I’m on my third box and I’ve been doing this for almost two years.” 
… Colette shows me the digitization system she researched and designed, which includes a digitizer that connects a basic tape player to a laptop via USB, the free and open-source audio software Audacity, two hard drives for storing files, and a CD folder where the compressed versions of each tape are cataloged for visiting researchers who would like to listen. Colette talks with pride about her ability to design a system that was in budget and works just as well as professional equipment: we “realized we could do it on the cheap because this thing [pointing to the digitizer] cost ten dollars and we get the same quality.” The system is, above all, good enough—the audio quality is remarkable, actually, and the portable hard drives are a decent substitute for the stable online repository that the archives would love to have but can’t afford. Colette showed me how to set up the digitization station, how to watch for and eliminate clipping, and how to noise-reduce the files, all of which she learned through a process of “trial and error,” made possible by a willingness at this archive to try something at which one is not an expert, to be wrong, even to fail.


(via nomorepotlucks » Out of the Basement and on to Internet: Digitizing Oral History Tapes at the Lesbian Herstory Archives – Cait McKinney)

    During my two months of dissertation research at the LHA, I spent an afternoon hanging out with Colette Montoya, a volunteer who works on digitizing the tapes every Friday. Colette is 31, a queer woman-of-color finishing her library science degree. She’s been volunteering at the archives for a couple of years, and she makes the regular 1.5-hour subway trip to the archives from her home in Queens, even though she’s already met the internship requirements for her degree. I asked Colette questions as she showed me how the tapes are digitized, and I guess I seemed surprised by the scale of this task relative to what she can get done in a day, week, or year. Nonplussed, Colette explained, “All these boxes are tapes,” pointing at the wall, “and they’re in sort of an order. I’m on my third box and I’ve been doing this for almost two years.”
    … Colette shows me the digitization system she researched and designed, which includes a digitizer that connects a basic tape player to a laptop via USB, the free and open-source audio software Audacity, two hard drives for storing files, and a CD folder where the compressed versions of each tape are cataloged for visiting researchers who would like to listen. Colette talks with pride about her ability to design a system that was in budget and works just as well as professional equipment: we “realized we could do it on the cheap because this thing [pointing to the digitizer] cost ten dollars and we get the same quality.” The system is, above all, good enough—the audio quality is remarkable, actually, and the portable hard drives are a decent substitute for the stable online repository that the archives would love to have but can’t afford. Colette showed me how to set up the digitization station, how to watch for and eliminate clipping, and how to noise-reduce the files, all of which she learned through a process of “trial and error,” made possible by a willingness at this archive to try something at which one is not an expert, to be wrong, even to fail.


    (via nomorepotlucks » Out of the Basement and on to Internet: Digitizing Oral History Tapes at the Lesbian Herstory Archives – Cait McKinney)

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