1. On Being Seen: An Interview with Claudia Rankine from Ferguson - The New Yorker

  2. La Boyer

  3. anneboyer:

    "Last week I read a letter from a doctor in a medical magazine which said that no truly happy person ever gets cancer.  Despite my knowing better ,and despite my having dealt with this blame-the-victim thinking for years, for a moment this letter hit my guilt button.  Had I really been guilty of the crime of not being happy in this best of all possible infernos?

    The idea that the cancer patient should be made to feel guilty about having had cancer, as if in some way it were all her fault for not having been in the right psychological frame of mind at all times to prevent cancer, is a monstrous distortion of the idea that we can use our psychic strengths to help heal ourselves…It does nothing to encourage the mobilization of our psychic defenses against the very real forms of death which surround us.  It is easier to demand happiness than to clean up the environment… Let us seek ‘joy’ rather than real food and clean air and a saner future on a liveable earth! As if happiness alone can protect us from the results of profit-madness.” — Audre Lorde, The Cancer Journals

    Reblogged from: anneboyer
  4. Joseph Carrier, Cultural Boys, Saigon, 1962 — as included in Danh Võ’s Good Life, 2007 grupaok

    Joseph Carrier, Cultural Boys, Saigon, 1962 — as included in Danh Võ’s Good Life, 2007 grupaok

    Reblogged from: grupaok
  5. Reblogged from: smashfizzle
  6. Reblogged from: elderlymag
  7. Filipino and Filipino American Academics Stand in Solidarity with Palestinian People | Critical Filipina and Filipino Studies Collective

    September 11, 2014
    Filipino and Filipino American Academics Stand in Solidarity with Palestinian People

    As Filipino and Filipino American academics, activists, organizers and allies, we stand in solidarity with the Palestinian people – in Gaza, the West Bank, and throughout the Palestinian diaspora. We denounce the state of Israel for its massacre of over 2100 Palestinians in its most recent military offensive into Gaza. This is only the most recent of over half a century of attacks by the Israeli state on the Palestinian people, dating back from the 1948 genocide and forced dispersal of Palestinians to the last decade of Israeli attacks on Gaza: Operation Cast Lead in the winter of 2008/2009, the 2012 offensive known as Operation Pillar of Defense, and the most recent 2014 attack, Operation Protective Edge. The most recent bombing of Gaza only exacerbates the ongoing conditions of dispossession and occupation by the Israeli military of the Palestinian people. Despite the recent ceasefire between Israel and Palestine, the widespread destruction of human lives and infrastructure has exacerbated an ongoing environmental and public health crisis in Gaza. We call for an end to the crippling blockade of Gaza, the violent military occupation of the West Bank by the Israeli military, and the illegal Israeli settlements in the West Bank. We demand the destruction of the Israeli apartheid wall, the right of return for all Palestinian refugees, and equal rights for all Palestinians, whether in ‘48 Palestine, the West Bank, Gaza, or throughout the Palestinian diaspora. As U.S.-based scholars, we are critical of the U.S. state and its role in funding the Israeli military for such barbaric ends. U.S. taxes, to the amount of $9.9 million per day, help fund the Israeli military. That is money allocated away from our schools, healthcare, and necessary social services. We also stand in solidarity with the over 36,000 Filipino overseas workers in Israel, who encounter the exploitation and dehumanization faced by all non-Jewish racialized immigrants in Israeli society.

    The CFFSC stands with all people resisting colonial domination, violent occupation, and dehumanizing racism. Like the state of Israel, the government of the Philippines is a client state of the U.S., with both governments receiving billions of dollars of military aid since their creation in the late 1940s. Like the Palestinian people, many people in the Philippines have been forced from their homes, including hundreds of thousands of Muslims and indigenous peoples from the Southern Philippines, as a result of wars and human rights violations encouraged by the continuing military aid of the U.S. to an oppressive state. However, as Filipinas and Filipinos in the U.S., we find inspiration and hope in the continuing struggles for self-determination, democracy, and an economy that serves the people of the Philippine archipelago, including Muslims, indigenous peoples, and Christians. We also find inspiration, hope, and points of commonality with other oppressed peoples’ resistance to injustice and oppression, in particular, the resilient imagination and everyday practices of Palestinian people to insist on their freedom.

    As scholars-activists and educators, the CFFSC supports academic freedom and the right to an education. As such, we denounce the Israeli military’s bombing of ten Palestinian educational institutions in Gaza, including the Islamic University of Gaza and a technical college. The restriction of movement of Palestinian scholars and students, from the Israeli checkpoints in the West Bank to the denial of exit to study at institutions abroad, make the basic human right of education impossible for many Palestinians. We denounce Israeli academic institutions for their collusion in the genocide and displacement of Palestinian communities. For example, Tel Aviv University, which is built on the former Palestinian village of Shayk Muwannis, conducts research for the advancement of Israeli military technology and tactics. As primarily U.S.-based scholars, we also call for an end to the tactics of intimidation meant to stifle academic freedom at U.S. institutions. The recent firing of Dr. Steven Salaita from his position at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, due to his social media statements in support of Palestine, demonstrates how scholars have been silenced by the threat of Zionist reprisal.

    The CFFSC supports the boycott, divestment, and sanctions (BDS) movement against Israeli institutions. As scholars within the broader field of Asian American studies, we have issued a statement of solidarity with the Association for Asian American Studies for its resolution in support of the academic and cultural boycott of Israel. We also applaud the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association, the Critical Ethnic Studies Association, and the African Literature Association for their recent endorsements of the academic boycott of Israel. The CFFSC calls on our colleagues within other academic disciplines to heed Palestinian civil society’s call for an international BDS movement.

    We stand in solidarity with Palestine and the international BDS movement in calling for freedom and justice for the Palestinian people. Please join us! The AAAS resolution can be found here:http://www.usacbi.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/AAAS-resolution.FINAL_.pdf. To learn more about the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement, please visit:http://www.bdsmovement.net/bdsintro.

    In Peace, Justice, and International Solidarity,

    The Critical Filipino and Filipina Studies Collective

    Kimberly Alidio

    Independent scholar and writer

    Jody Blanco

    Department of Literature

    UC San Diego

    Jeff A. Cabusao

    Department of English and Cultural Studies, Bryant University

    Faye Caronan,

    University of Colorado

    Christine Chai

    De Anza College, CA

    Peter Chua

    San Jose State University

    Vicente M. Diaz

    Associate Professor of American Indian Studies and Anthropology

    Affiliate Faculty, Asian American Studies and History

    University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign

    Josen Masangkay Diaz, Ph.D.

    Postdoctoral Fellow, Ethnic Studies

    University of San Diego

    Sarita Echavez See

    University of California Riverside

    Luis H. Francia

    New York University

    Valerie Francisco-Menchavez

    Assistant Professor, Sociology and Social Work, University of Portland

    Vernadette Vicuña Gonzalez

    American Studies Department

    University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

    Estella Habal

    Associate Professor

    San Jose State University

    Wayne Jopanda

    Undergraduate Student in Comparative Ethnic Studies and Political Science

    University of California, Berkeley

    Faith R. Kares

    Northwestern University

    Dr. Vina A. Lanzona

    Associate Professor, Department of History

    University of Hawaii at Manoa

    Dale Maglalang

    Undergraduate student, San Francisco State University

    Victor Román Mendoza

    Assistant Professor, Women’s Studies and English

    Faculty Associate, Center for Southeast Asian Studies and Asian/Pacific Islander American Studies Program

    University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

    Sherwin Mendoza

    Adjunct Faculty, Intercultural Studies and Language Arts

    De Anza College

    Darlene Marie E. Mortel

    Ph.D. Candidate, American Studies

    University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa

    Theresa Christine Navarro, M.A.

    American Studies, University of Hawaii

    Melissa-Ann Nievera-Lozano

    University of California, Santa Cruz

    Robyn Magalit Rodriguez

    Associate Professor, Asian American Studies, UC Davis

    Dean Saranillio

    New York University

    Amanda Solomon Amorao

    PhD, Literature, University of California, San Diego

    Executive Director, Kuya Ate Mentorship Program

    DeNNiS M. SOmeRa

    Graduate student, Performance Studies, UC Davis

    Harrod J Suarez

    Assistant Professor of English and Comparative American Studies

    Oberlin College

    Neferti Tadiar

    Professor of Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies

    Barnard College

    Thea Quiray Tagle

    PhD Candidate, Dept. of Ethnic Studies, University of California, San Diego

    Visiting Faculty, Dept. of Interdisciplinary Studies, San Francisco Art Institute

    Rowena Tomaneng

    De Anza College, CA

    Rolando B. Tolentino, Dean

    University of the Philippines, College of Mass Communication

    Gina Velasco, Ph.D.

    Assistant Professor

    Women’s and Gender Studies Department

    Affiliate Faculty, American Studies Program

    Keene State College

    Mark Villegas

    PhD. candidate, Culture and Theory

    University of California, Irvine

    Michael Viola, Ph.D.

    Core Faculty, Liberal Studies Program - Graduate Programs in Leadership and Change


    Note: Institutional affiliations are provided for identification purposes only.

  8. 다비 

희미해진 몸의 촉수를 켠 장작들
위에 가볍게 얹히는 별빛의 무게 

봄 흐트러진 사과나무 꽃밭 석천사 앞뜰에서
틀어진 세월에 꽃잎을 띄워 주시며
나의 서른 살을 배웅해 주셨던 지오 스님

둥글게 잘 익은 사과 한 알로 누워
눈부신 씨앗만이 남겨질 때까지
사라지므로 비로소 존재하는
먹음직스런 역설을 보여 주기 위해 

함께 돌아갈 길과
먼저 가야 할 길을 잘 포개어
단단히 묶는 어둠이 그의 몸에

불붙인다. 

사과 향기 그윽하다.



Dabi*
Kim Myung Won 

Firewood with dimmed appendages of light
slightly weighted with stars. 

Spring bloomed at the apple tree, flower patches
in front of Suk-Chun Temple courtyard. Picking petals
off my twisted time, Monk Ji-O saw thirty years of my life.

Lying down as a round well-ripened apple
until only dazzling seeds remained
to reveal a paradox: you are present
only after disappearing.

Both the return trip
and the trip that has to be taken first, superimposed
by darkness, firmly tied together,

set his body on fire 

The scent of apples is profound. 



Translation from the Korean
By EJ Koh

When I first came to translation, I was fourteen years old. My mother lived in South Korea and I lived in Davis, California. She would post me letters in Korean from 5,700 miles away. In my desperation to know her words, I sat with a letter she sent each Friday. Using a Korean dictionary, I deciphered circles and lines: “Miss you,” “Wait another year,” “My little girl.” I translated to be embraced by her words and to weep with them—with her. For me, translation is personal. What affected me about my mother’s letters were not the words themselves, but what those words were tied to. Though it took many years to learn, I aim to translate less with the mind and more with the heart. 
…
Translating Kim Myung Won’s “Dabi” and other poems with my mother and father was the first thing we had done together. Not only was it a physical act that somehow vanished the distance of years, but translating became a cultural exchange in the accretion of language and experiences that reveal a mythology of the “I” in its South Korean root, which we shared.



(via The Mythology of “I” in Translation: Kim Myung Won’s “Dabi” | World Literature Today)

    다비

    희미해진 몸의 촉수를 켠 장작들
    위에 가볍게 얹히는 별빛의 무게

    봄 흐트러진 사과나무 꽃밭 석천사 앞뜰에서
    틀어진 세월에 꽃잎을 띄워 주시며
    나의 서른 살을 배웅해 주셨던 지오 스님

    둥글게 잘 익은 사과 한 알로 누워
    눈부신 씨앗만이 남겨질 때까지
    사라지므로 비로소 존재하는
    먹음직스런 역설을 보여 주기 위해

    함께 돌아갈 길과
    먼저 가야 할 길을 잘 포개어
    단단히 묶는 어둠이 그의 몸에

    불붙인다.

    사과 향기 그윽하다.

    Dabi*
    Kim Myung Won

    Firewood with dimmed appendages of light
    slightly weighted with stars.

    Spring bloomed at the apple tree, flower patches
    in front of Suk-Chun Temple courtyard. Picking petals
    off my twisted time, Monk Ji-O saw thirty years of my life.

    Lying down as a round well-ripened apple
    until only dazzling seeds remained
    to reveal a paradox: you are present
    only after disappearing.

    Both the return trip
    and the trip that has to be taken first, superimposed
    by darkness, firmly tied together,

    set his body on fire

    The scent of apples is profound.

    Translation from the Korean
    By EJ Koh

    When I first came to translation, I was fourteen years old. My mother lived in South Korea and I lived in Davis, California. She would post me letters in Korean from 5,700 miles away. In my desperation to know her words, I sat with a letter she sent each Friday. Using a Korean dictionary, I deciphered circles and lines: “Miss you,” “Wait another year,” “My little girl.” I translated to be embraced by her words and to weep with them—with her. For me, translation is personal. What affected me about my mother’s letters were not the words themselves, but what those words were tied to. Though it took many years to learn, I aim to translate less with the mind and more with the heart.

    Translating Kim Myung Won’s “Dabi” and other poems with my mother and father was the first thing we had done together. Not only was it a physical act that somehow vanished the distance of years, but translating became a cultural exchange in the accretion of language and experiences that reveal a mythology of the “I” in its South Korean root, which we shared.

    (via The Mythology of “I” in Translation: Kim Myung Won’s “Dabi” | World Literature Today)

  9. Take this bunch of happy, armless children, making things look very cool but also there to give integrity to the flat sheet metal. I would maim for this gate, which I believe is the gate to an orphanage. (via Yapak / Yakap: Fun in Gate Fabrication)

    Take this bunch of happy, armless children, making things look very cool but also there to give integrity to the flat sheet metal. I would maim for this gate, which I believe is the gate to an orphanage. (via Yapak / Yakap: Fun in Gate Fabrication)

  10. earthskybodyworks:

    AUTHENTIC MOVEMENT APPETIZER

    Hello Friends,

    If you were interested in the AM series on Wednesdays, but can not make that day and time then you might be interested in a one time workshop this coming SUNDAY.

    SUNDAY 9/14/14
    4-6pm
    At a beautiful private studio in Travis Heights.
    Sliding Scale $20 - $40 

    Please email me to register for the class (I will share all the info about location and parking upon registration).
    earthskybody@gmail.com  *  512-699-1086


    This class will be an introduction to the form of Authentic Movement, and if you are thinking about taking the Wednesday series (Medicinal Dance - starting 9/24), then this would be a nice appetizer!
    This class is open to all levels, wise well practiced folks as well as beginners!
    As always, please call or email with any questions.
    And no partner necessary.
    This work is always revealing, in the best ways :o)

    Love
    Laurenimage

    Reblogged from: earthskybodyworks
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